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Archive for July, 2017

By Andy Beckingham FFPH, Fernandez Hospital, Hyderabad

Giggling Girls!

The scope of our profession gives opportunities to branch out. These may not always look at first glance like ‘public health’.

In 2010, working in India on maternal mortality, someone asked over dinner if I thought UK-style midwifery might be useful in India where doctors provided all the care. “Perhaps if you try the bits that work for women,” I said. “And avoid the bits that the NHS got so wrong.” My dinner companion turned out to be the MD of India’s most famous maternity hospital, and I found myself designing her midwifery pilot programme.

The midwife who had run the UK’s most woman-friendly midwifery service (the Albany Practice, which achieved great outcomes for disadvantaged women) was inveigled into joining us as a mentor. Eight anxious trainees found themselves becoming India’s first evidence-based woman-centred midwives (pictured). They began to develop their own profession, promoting choice about labour and supporting and empowering women to have more natural births. They had to challenge established obstetric practice. Our hospital’s maternity care began to change. Babies had been routinely separated from the mother at birth, although this impedes attachment and breastfeeding. The midwives worked with paediatricians to change that. Now most mothers have immediate contact and breastfeed their babies in the first hour.

Now leaders in their own right, those first eight have since mentored other trainees to become strong professional midwives, supporting thousands of Indian women to have better births.

Like most countries, India has unnecessarily high rates of intervention in childbirth. A local public hospital’s c-section rate is 52%. A local private hospital’s is 90%. But thanks to the midwives, ours has come right down. Instead of epidurals being routine, midwives ask women what pain relief they want. They offer choice. Women get continuity of care. The outcomes are better. Satisfaction rates are high.

In 2017, the state government invited us to train midwives to work in their hospitals too. They want c-section rates to come down. But they also want compassionate, respectful maternity care for the large numbers of women who are mostly ‘below poverty line’. So maybe, just maybe, this could become a model for wider public maternal-health improvement in lower-income countries. I have to assess its impact.

Designing a midwifery programme and curriculum doesn’t at first look like a public health role. But it is starting to address unmet needs, inequalities and disadvantage, improve care quality and effectiveness, show that Indian women and their choices matter. Of course, it will need to be part of wider action on social and economic determinants of maternal health.

And now, this alternative to the medical model is available, and the state government is actively promoting compassionate, effective midwifery care and supporting us to roll out professional midwifery more widely, among very disadvantaged women.

Public health, in disguise.

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By Dr Justin Varney, National Lead for Adult Health and Wellbeing, Public Health England

Public Health England estimates that between 2-5% of the population identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual or other – comparable to many ethnic minority and faith populations. Despite legislative reform many LGBT people continue to experience discrimination, marginalisation and harassment.

  • 38 per cent of trans people have experienced physical intimidation and threats and 81 per cent have experienced silent harassment (e.g. being stared at/whispered about)
  • One in five (19 per cent) lesbian, gay and bi employees have experienced verbal bullying from colleagues, customers or service users because of their sexual orientation in the last five years
  • Almost 1 in 4 trans people are made to use an inappropriate toilet in the workplace, or none at all, in the early stages of transition. At work over 10% of trans people experienced being verbally abused and 6% were physically assaulted.

The impact of this discrimination on mental health is easy to understand, however the stark data on suicide and self-harm demonstrates the depth of the impact that this discrimination can have:

  • 52% of young LGBT people reported self-harm either recently or in the past compared to 25% of heterosexual non-trans young people and 44% of young LGBT people have considered suicide compared to 26% of heterosexual non-trans young people
  • Prescription for Change (2008) found that in the last year, 5% of lesbians and bisexual women say they have attempted to take their own life. This increases to 7% of bisexual women, 7% of black and minority ethnic women and 10% of lesbians and bisexual women with a disability
  • The Gay Men’s Health Survey (2013) found that in the last year, 3% of gay men have attempted to take their own life. This increases to 5% of black and minority ethnic men, 5% of bisexual men and 7% of gay and bisexual men with a disability. In the same period, 0.4% of all men attempted to take their own life
  • The Trans Mental Health Study (2012) found that 11% of trans people had thought about ending their lives at some point in the last year and 33% had attempted to take their life more than once in their lifetime, 3% attempting suicide more than 10 times.

The impacts aren’t limited to mental health, and the level of inequalities in lifestyle behaviours such as smoking and substance misuse will almost certainly play out in a great burden of chronic disease and premature mortality over the life course.

The evidence base of inequalities affecting LGBT populations continues to grow as we get better at incorporating sexual orientation and gender identity into the demographics of research and population surveys. Positively, as the NHS rolls out the sexual orientation monitoring information standard this year, this understanding will no doubt continue to grow.

As public health professionals we have a responsibility to advocate for the populations in our care, and this should include advocating for LGBT populations. Lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans communities are diverse, vibrant and varied and have many assets, although the LGBT community sector has faced fiscal challenges due to the economy there remain many small local LGBT organisations that are keen to work with public health teams to address these inequalities.  This is population who clearly need our professional expertise, advocacy and support to co-produce solutions for change and one where we could have a real impact.

So during this lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans Pride season please take up the opportunity to engage, empower and partner with your local LGBT community.

FPH is committed to improving the health and well-being of the LGBT population. If you would like to join us in our work please consider joining our Equality & Diversity Special Interest Group or our LGBT Health Special Interest Group. To express an interest in joining please email policy@fph.org.uk and we can help you get started!

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Dr Alisha Davies, Head of Research and Development, Public Health Wales

We understand the importance of good quality, sustainable employment for health. We also recognise that economic shocks, such as the loss of a high number of jobs in a localised area, can have a detrimental impact on the health, social and financial situation of individuals. In the years following a mass unemployment event workers can experience double the risk of death from heart attack or stroke and even greater increases in problems such as alcohol related disease, alongside detrimental effects on mental health. The impact can extend beyond those directly made redundant to families, local communities, and the effects endure over many generations.

Preparedness to address the health consequences of mass unemployment events is of national and international importance – yet there is very little information on how to better prepare and respond to such events. The public health discipline has emergency planning response frameworks for other events, such as flooding, which have a significant impact on individual and community health, but not mass unemployment.

Working with academic experts and those previously involved in public health responses to mass unemployment events across the globe – from the motor industry in Australia, to mining in New Zealand, Public Health Wales have developed a basic framework to support public, voluntary and private sectors with prevention, planning for and reaction to mass unemployment events.

The recently launched report provides an eight-step framework to support public, voluntary and private sectors with prevention, planning for and reaction to mass unemployment events. Key priorities where public health approaches can help are highlighted including early identification of areas at risk; ensuring the reactive responses address the health and wellbeing needs of all those affected alongside financial and re-employment advice; providing accessible support for families, and the wider community – in particular vulnerable groups, such as the long term unemployed; and increasing awareness through community and third sector links.

Preventative measures identified by those interviewed included longer term consideration of skills development, investment and diversification, social responsibility of employers announcing redundancies, and increasing individual and community resilience.

This report is an important tool to inform action to help prevent and minimise the consequences and harms of mass unemployment events (MUEs) to population health. The work was taken forward following events in Wales, but has national and international reach across many European and International countries.

NOTES:
The report and info-graphic will be available on the day of launch in English and Welsh, and it will be announced on our Public Health Wales website on Friday 30th June (www.publichealthwales.org).

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